michael hageloh

How can one person—or one company—change the world? It takes big ideas, to be sure, but it also takes more than that. It takes a personal or corporate culture that fosters innovation and problem-solving. It takes a certain sense of showmanship—a commitment to always be selling, marketing those big ideas and proving their mettle. Over the last three decades, michael hageloh, the creator of the Rhythm-Selling System, has exemplified each of these traits time and time again, both in his personal life and in his corporate positions.

A rare authority on Apple, the greatest sales company ever, michael is a world-changer to be sure, and he has accomplished big things through fairly modest tools—which are the principles behind Rhythm-Selling as a system: Such old-fashioned values as superior product development, stalwart customer service, and a ceaseless devotion to a company culture of selling. michael is best known for the 22 years he spent inside Apple, from its formative years up through 2010. During this time he became one of the company’s all-time global sales leaders, generating almost a billion dollars ($1B) in overall revenue, and led Apple’s education division to new horizons and bold achievements. Always framed in authentic conversations with a distinctive rhythm.

In addition, michael sold for Adobe and served at other worthy tech startups. Today he applies his unique perspective to his work as he delivers his Rhythm Selling keynotes globally.

michael can speak with authority on the culture in an organization and the powerful results that can be attained through the recognizing, fine tuning and external manifestation of it. Remember, every word represents your culture. Are you a selling organization or do you just have sales people?

This page offers some insights into who michael is and what he has accomplished as an author, a keynote speaker, and a successful jack of many trades and master of only one: selling. We invite you to read his personal blog and learn how to retain michael as a sales event host or keynote speaker. See what Rhythm Selling can do for your culture today. For more information, or to book michael for an event, please contact us today.

Blog Posts

On a travel hiatus

On a travel hiatus

On a travel hiatus for a month or so looking for nuts.

Will America Embrace the Right to be Forgotten?

Will America Embrace the Right to be Forgotten?

What does Google say about you? By now most of us have been made aware of the profound need for a Google self-appraisal. Whether you’re looking for a new job, a scholarship, or a big promotion—whether you’re seeking public office or just trying to get a date—what the Internet says about you matters, and Google is the most prominent and influential gatekeeper. An entire industry, christened “online reputation management,” sprang up a few years back to help people and businesses manage what Google says about them; as of right now, that industry seems to be dwindling, but interest in matters of online privacy does not. Privacy is the Issue of the Day In fact, online privacy is a bigger deal than ever. You remember the big NSA bombshells, and you’re familiar with some of the more recent episodes in online privacy breach. You may also be aware of the Right to Be Forgotten movement, which is a massive thing in Europe and has proven victorious in many high courts. The movement is all about online privacy, and embraces the right that we all have, as individuals, to disappear off Google’s radar. A recent Wall Street Journal article helpfully summarizes the result of one such court victory: “Under the new rule, people can demand that Google, Bing and other engines remove links to pages that come up when one searches for their names.” As you might imagine, privacy advocates are pretty keen on the idea of slipping off Google’s map, while Google itself is not as thrilled. A delegation from the company has embarked on a tour of Europe, offering its take on the issue. Privacy in the USA Over in Europe, this is a big deal; here in the United States, you don’t hear much about it at all, and we certainly don’t seem very close to passing our own version of a Right to Be Forgotten bill. That’s kind of funny, given how privacy-obsessed this nation tends to be. It’s understandable, of course, why some might think the Right to Be Forgotten concept is a slippery slope. Does your Right to Be Forgotten include deleting all references to your criminal record? To sex offenses? To defrauding investors or committing some other act of corporate fraud? Aren’t there certain things the rest of us have a right to know? Admittedly, there seems to be more and more skepticism out there about the amount of dirt Google has on us—but if we disallowed tech companies to collect and store certain information, would it be reflected in a less-robust array of personalized services? I’m asking you. What’s your take on the Right to Be Forgotten? Do you think it could ever catch on in America—and do you think it should?

Should Your Company Be Fun?

Should Your Company Be Fun?

A recent article from Entrepreneur.com offers some steps on creating a “fun, positive company culture.” But of course, this raises as many questions as it does answers. Like: Never mind the how of making your company culture fun. What about the why? Is it even a worthwhile goal to try to make your company a fun place to work? A Question of Motives The author at Entrepreneur.com obviously thinks so. “I’ve always believed businesses that encourage play are the ones where the best people do their best work,” the article begins. “Employees love to work hard when they also get to play hard.” My own answer to the question: It depends. What are your motives for making your company culture fun? Why are you making this your goal? You have to answer those questions before you do anything else. There are plenty of good reasons to try to make your company fun. There’s some truth to the idea that a fun workplace can help you with employee retention—though only if it’s paired with opportunities for meaningful career advancement. I also think there’s something to be said for a fun culture as an incubator of creativity. If you want to make your company a fun place to work because you think your employees will be happier, healthier, more productive, and more motivated, then you won’t hear any argument from me. The Wrong Reasons With that said, there is such a thing as doing an okay thing for the wrong reasons. I can think of a few bad reasons for building a fun company culture. One is because you simply want to be known as a fun place to work—which may help you get new job applicants in the door, but then what are you doing to keep them there? As a goal, this is fairly shortsighted. Meanwhile, I think some companies want to make themselves fun without ever pausing to think about the measurable results they hope to achieve from that. This is probably a shallow view of company culture—unless you just value fun for fun’s sake. And hey! I’m a fun-loving guy, so don’t take any of this as a criticism of the idea of fun company culture. I just think it’s important to pursue this thoughtfully—and to have some sense of why you’re doing it.

Company Culture and Your Hiring Policies

Company Culture and Your Hiring Policies

I’ve said it before, but it bears repeating: Your company has a culture, just as you have your own personal culture. Period. End of story. Maybe you don’t know what your culture is, and maybe you’ve done nothing to actively build your culture, but you can’t not have one. From the second you started thinking about your company, your actions have been slowly but surely carving out a cultural identity for your business. That’s important to note, I think, in light of the myriad articles out there about building company culture. I absolutely agree that companies should be deliberate in shaping and managing their culture, but don’t make the mistake of thinking you can just abstain from having a culture. You can control your culture yourself or you can let it arise haphazardly, but you’ll have one, one way or the other. Culture and Decision Making This is all so very important because your company culture will absolutely inform your corporate decision-making—and vice versa. It’s sort of an endless loop: Your decisions will be influenced by your company’s fundamental values, and those decisions will in turn shape your company’s values. And on and on it goes. This includes decision making at all levels, but your hiring decisions may top the list. A recent article from Entrepreneur.com explains why this is so: “Entrepreneurs work hard to build and cultivate the culture of their organizations. But company culture doesn’t result from an edict from upper management. It’s made up of the work and values of every employee. Each new hire can contribute to sustaining or eroding that culture.” Continues the article: “Hiring employees who understand and exemplify company values serves to reinforce the organization’s mission and vision and create a tighter team.” Hiring for Fit That’s all well and good—but how does a company hire new employees for organizational fit—not just for skills or items on a resume? The article offers a trio of good tips: Think about your values, and translate them into a list of behaviors. Use that list of behaviors to come up with relevant interview questions. Be deliberate in communicating your core cultural values to job applicants/interviewees. That all sounds fair enough to me—but I hasten to add that the really important first step is just acknowledging that your company has a culture, and being honest with yourself about what that culture is; how you might like to change it; and how it ultimately plays out in your decision-making, hiring and otherwise.

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